Meet Ahmed

In a remote corner of his profession

When you hear about the railroad, the imagination is not exactly triggered to dream about a multitude of opportunities and possibilities. Even the word ‘railroad’ is most reminiscent of anything from the times when there was no colour in the pictures, and the camera itself was an incredible new invention. What very few are experiencing is the wide range of work areas in the Rail industry. Take Ahmed Saed Mehdi Alhakak, who reads Digital media technology at DTU. What the hell is he doing in the Rail industry? There is no unequivocal answer, but he is in a position where he is challenged in one of the farthest corners of his profession. Furthermore, in a gigantic international company, which in no way reflects the straitjacket the rail industry otherwise might apply to its admirers, when looked upon from a more traditional, prejudiced perspective. But it could not be further from reality. “I really like to explore and experience what opportunities the engineering profession has to offer.”

The innovative youngster realizes that there are other interesting aspects of the engineering profession. Ahmed starts as an intern at Siemens during his engineering internship in connection with his profession bachelor and is subsequently hired as a student assistant in the company. Today he works with railway technology. He has a bachelor’s degree in Diploma IT, and in fact, he doesn’t know that it can be connected to rail technology, but figures out that the two fields are not necessarily that far from each other. He can easily draw on the technical knowledge he has from his bachelor when he works with the railway for Siemens.

“It has had a tremendous impact on me to get some practical experience in my education, both personally and professionally – it has really taught me that the engineering profession is incredibly broad and that the rail industry is undervalued. The entire engineering mindset can be used in different contexts, and as long as you have the fundamental skills in order, you have what it takes.”

What does your job mean to you?

It is obvious that Ahmed is an ambitious young man and he puts great value in the work he is doing.

“My workplace really means a lot to me. I’m really happy to be involved in making a difference for so many people and I feel that the tasks I get delegated are big and important. It gives me a feeling that I am part of something big and it motivates me a lot.”

What do you think makes the Rail industry particularly exciting?

“I think it’s fascinating how a means of transport can connect cities so easily, even if there is so much space between them. I have used public transport most of my life, and for someone like me it’s pretty cool, to experience how the opportunities are optimised increasingly.”

Ahmed thinks it’s exciting to follow the progress of the work he’s doing. He usually starts completely from scratch, gets some requirements to be met, then finds the right prices and finally calculates what equipment is needed. At Siemens, Ahmed is currently providing offers at Odense Letbane and Ring 3. In particular, the latter project has created a special relationship. Ring 3 will run the route that he usually uses when he is going to and from DTU.

“It does in a way make my work even more interesting because it’s something I can relate to.” he tells.

Ahmed thinks it’s exciting to follow the progress of the work he’s doing. He usually starts completely from scratch, gets some requirements to be met, then finds the right prices and finally calculates what equipment is needed. At Siemens, Ahmed is currently providing offers at Odense Letbane and Ring 3. In particular, the latter project has created a special relationship. Ring 3 will run the route that he usually uses when he is going to and from DTU.

“It does in a way make my work even more interesting because it’s something I can relate to.” he tells.

What does the future of the railway industry look like? 

The answer is hiding in the media image of the industry, according to Ahmed. There aren’t a lot of talking about the development of the industry where focus is much more on delays and break downs on the tracks. “The huge progression of the industry should be ignited something more and the vital importance of the industry has for Denmark must be stressed” He supports his argument by deepening:

“So if I just want to scratch up what’s going to happen for the next 10 years, it’s crazy to think about the great importance it’s going to get for Denmark. There will be a light rail in Odense, a light rail in Copenhagen, the new Metro ring becomes a reality, and there will be a rail link between Køge and Copenhagen. All this is going to mean that dependence on having a car is diminishing and that cities are going to feel significantly closer to each other.”

What Ahmed’s future looks like

Ahmed thinks it might be interesting to work as a project manager, and says he thinks it would be exciting to lead an optimization of the S-trains. He feels quite carefree for his future within the industry and explains that this is due to the fact that both the engineering profession and the railway industry are so versatile and that both areas are constantly evolving, opening up new opportunities.

In spite of prejudice and the dusty image, Ahmed has experienced becoming part of an industry in enormous development. You can’t actually reproach him, that he might not have considered the Rail industry as an opportunity due to his study, but fortunately some wise people once said: “Don’t judge a book by its cover” – and Ahmed chose to listen to.

 

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